Following Instructions: Learn How to Write an Essay

Writing an essay can be difficult for a lot of people, but if you follow these simple instructions, you’ll have no problem writing an essay!

First, what type of essay are you writing?

Narrative Essays tell a story.

Descriptive Essays paint a picture.

Analytical Essays analyze something.

Expository Essays are informative about something.

Persuasive Essays try to convince the reader of something.

There are several types of essays, but these are the 5 most common. Once you know which of these you are writing, it is time to begin the prewriting stage.

Prewriting

If you’re writing an expository, analytical, or a persuasive essay, do research. You need to know all the facts so you can be knowledgeable of your topic.

If you are writing a narrative or a descriptive essay, brainstorm and write down details you are going to write about so the story or the description has depth. Such as: a character’s physical features, past, relationship with another character, the contents of a room, etc. The details are important and will make your story easy to read.

Thesis

Once you have all the information and know what you want to say, write a thesis. A thesis is your main point summed up in a sentence or two. It is to let the reader know where you’ll be going in your essay and why.

Outline

Once you have everything ready, write an outline for your essay. This will help you to organize your ideas and will make writing your essay much easier.

Format

A good basic format for all essays:

Introduction

  • Thesis Statement
  • Transitional “hook” to move the reader down to the 1st Body Paragraph

Body Paragraph #1

  • The strongest point, most significant example, or an obvious beginning point
  • The first sentence should be a “reverse hook” that ties into the previous transition
  • Topic for this paragraph in first or second sentence
  • Transition to the 2nd Body Paragraph

Body Paragraph #2

  • The second strongest point, the second most significant example, or an obvious follow up
  • The first sentence should have a “reverse hook” to tie into the previous transition
  • Topic for this paragraph in first or second sentence
  • Transition to the 3rd Body Paragraph

Body Paragraph #3

  • The weakest argument, weakest example, or obvious follow up
  • The first sentence should have a “reverse hook” to tie into the previous transition
  • Topic for this paragraph in first or second sentence
  • Final transition leading to the Conclusion and signaling to the reader that this is the final major point

Conclusion

  • Written in a way that is an allusion to the Introduction
  • Restate the thesis
  • Summary of the 3 main points from the body paragraphs
  • Final statement
 
 

2018 © InstitutoAtitudesusTentavel.org. Improve your essay writing with our project.